Pre-Summit Restorative Justice Forum

Restorative Justice Forum

A free event open to the public

Thursday, May 29 | 2:00 – 4:30 pm

Coray Auditorium, Todd Beamer Center

Register now for the Restorative Justice Forum using the form below!  This event is free and open to the public.  If you are interested in attending the entire Correctional Ministry Summit (May 29-31, 2014), please click HERE to complete your online Summit registration.

*Please note: If you are already registered for IMPACT 2014, you do not need to fill out this form.

Restorative Justice Forum Registration

About the Event

Lisa Rea, President and Founder of Restorative Justice International, is hosting the Restorative Justice Forum including a victims’ panel. You will learn about victims-driven restorative justice and how the movement is expanding rapidly in the U.S. and globally. Victims of violent crime from around the United States will tell their stories of how violent crime has impacted their lives. Each victim will discuss the value of restorative justice to them. As we hear from a diverse group of crime victims you will learn about the following topics: 1) questions that go unanswered in the lives of victims, 2) their view of victim-offender dialogue and other restorative justice processes, 3) barriers that might exist prohibiting victims from feeling satisfied with the current justice system and 4) restorative justice and forgiveness—are they the same? These questions and many others will be explored as we grapple together with justice reform based on restorative justice.

Other panelists will include Jack Cowley who in 1996 joined the staff of Prison Fellowship Ministries as a public policy advocate for criminal justice reform and later Director of the InnerChange Freedom Initiative (IFI), an intensive faith based prison re-entry program,  Ilinda Jackson, Coordinator of the Victim Services Unit for the Oklahoma Department of Corrections and Harold Dean Trulear, Director of Healing Communities Prison Ministry and Prisoner Reentry Project of the Philadelphia Leadership Foundation.

 

Lisa Rea, Founder
Restorative Justice International

Lisa_RheaLisa Rea has extensive experience in public policy and legislative advocacy in the U.S. serving on staff for three California state legislators and as consultant and lobbyist in the private and public sectors.

Lisa is a national and international restorative justice expert with 20 years’ experience including 10 years working with victims of violent crime. She served as state director for Justice Fellowship and a consultant to Prison Fellowship International. In 2001, Lisa founded The Justice & Reconciliation Project, JRP, a national nonprofit which organized and educated crime victims about restorative justice. She is the founder and president of Restorative Justice International, RJI, an association and network with over 2500 members and affiliates working to expand the use of victims-driven restorative justice in the U.S. and globally. Lisa is the president of Rea Consulting which provides government relations assistance and restorative justice consulting services.

You can reach Lisa through Restorative Justice International @ restorativejusticeinternational@comcast.net and via its website: http://restorativejusticeinternational.com or at Rea Consulting @ reaconsulting@comcast.net.

Lisa will  also moderate a workshop at the Summit on Friday, May 3oth,, 10:00 am:  Victims-Driven Restorative Justice: What It’s About and Why It’s So Important to Crime Victims and Offenders.  Workshop Schedule >>

Crime Victim Panel Members

Stephen_Watt

Wyoming State Representative Stephen Watt -In March of 1982 while serving as a Wyoming State Trooper Stephen Watt was shot five times by a bank robber: once in the head and four times in the back. Steve grew to hate the robber with his every breath of air. After losing his job to PTSD, Steve struggled to put his life back together and overcome his hate. In 1986 Steve forgave the man who shot him and reached out to him meeting him in prison. Steve has attended Mark’s parole hearings asking for his release. He travels the United States sharing his story of being shot, hate, forgiveness and friendship. Steve is a three term representative in the Wyoming House and advocates for restorative Justice in Wyoming.

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Jennifer Bishop Jenkins – Illinois – Jennifer Bishop Jenkins is the sister of Nancy Bishop Langert, who along with her husband Richard and their unborn child, were murdered in Winnetka, Illinois in 1990. Inspired by her sister’s dying words of love, Jennifer spent the last two decades advocating for violence prevention and to support crime victims. A retired high school teacher, Jennifer has been working with troubled youth and violent offenders in Restorative Justice programs, advocating for victims’ rights and human rights, and lobbying for gun violence prevention. Jennifer currently serves as Director of Marsy’s Law for Illinois .

Russ Turner_small

Russell Turner – California – Russ Turner is the Director and Founder of Candlelight Foundation based in California which works with grieving families suffering the loss of a child. Russ speaks in support of victim offender dialogue as a part of the restorative process. The loss of Russ’s oldest son, Jeremy, to violent crime was the starting point for this effort. Russ is a graduate of the School of Cinema at the University of Southern California with forty years in the field of Motion Picture and Television as a producer and director of videos and films in the public and private sector.

Chery Ward Kaiser Photo
 

Cheryl Ward Kaiser – California – Cheryl is a victim of violent crime who has been a leader in California’s restorative justice movement since the 1990s. Her journey began with the murder of her husband and rape of her daughter on June 14, 1991 in Salinas, California. Cheryl was instrumental in the creation of the Monterey County Restorative Justice Commission. She speaks nationally about her support for restorative justice and frequently speaks before youth and adults in custody at youth detention centers and state prisons